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The Polygraphs

31 Jan

polygraph

Nina suggested we look at articles and statements about Trista’s polygraph but I wanted to look at all articles and statements about the polygraphs on both sides of Ayla’s family. Below is everything I could find with all statements bolded by me. If you know of any I missed, please link them in a comment and I will add them to the post.

1/14/12 CM
“I asked for a polygraph on day one,” DiPietro said Friday during an interview with the Morning Sentinel. “I’ve taken one, and the results, I was never allowed to see them. It’s something you’re going to have to ask law enforcement about.”

DiPietro, 24, was told how he did on the test, Steve McCausland, spokesman for the Department of Public Safety, said. He said he was baffled by DiPietro’s statement that he didn’t know the results.

“He knows how he did, because we told him,” McCausland said. “To say that he didn’t know, is just not true.”

McCausland would not say how DiPietro did. “That is something I can’t get into,” he said.

DiPietro said, “I know I went in there and smoked it. I told the truth and that’s that.”

When asked if police told him the results, DiPietro said. “They can tell me whatever they want. Again, I didn’t physically see the results.”

When asked if police told him he failed the test, DiPietro said, “That’s all irrelevant. I wanted to see the results myself. They’re not letting me see them. Why don’t they let the public see them?”

McCausland said the polygraph exam results would be difficult to read without training.

“It’s lines on a paper, similar to an electrocardiogram report,” he said. “The polygraph operator knows the results, but there’s no transcript or written text that goes with it.

“It’s very simiilar to doctors interpreting an EKG. Polygraph operators work in a similar fashion.”

DiPietro said he took one polygraph exam, administered by a single detective.

DiPietro wouldn’t say what he was asked, but briefly described the equipment.

“You’ve got things on your fingers, you’ve got things across your chest,” he said.

He also sat on a seat pad that was part of the polygraph exam equipment, he said.

Asked if other family members had taken a polygraph exam, DiPietro said he was not sure.

“I just know about myself,” he said. “Again, anything (police have) asked us to do, we’ve cooperated. We’ve made ourselves available to them.

“Anytime they’ve had a question about something, if they want us to come to the station … more than willing. We’re cooperating. There’s nothing to hide here.”

McCausland said Maine State Police have three or more polygraph operators and the tests are used for investigative purposes and for pre-employment screening for Maine law enforcement officers.

He said the test results cannot be used as evidence in court cases.

1/16/12 BDN 
The mother of Ayla Reynolds said reports last week that Ayla’s father, Justin DiPietro, took a polygraph test administered by investigators has heightened her doubt about whether DiPietro is telling the truth. Trista Reynolds also said she and others in her family are arranging with investigators to take their own polygraph tests.

Reynolds declined to say when she will take a polygraph test because she didn’t want to create expectations among the public in case for some reason it doesn’t happen as scheduled. She also said she doesn’t want to interfere in the investigative process.

“When I go, you best believe I’m going to tell everyone out there the results,” said Reynolds, who added that some of her family members also are expected to take polygraph tests. “I have been offering to take a polygraph test since Day One.”

Asked Monday why DiPietro was given a polygraph test weeks ago while Reynolds’ is just now being arranged, McCausland would not comment.

“Those are investigative details we’re just not getting into,” he said.

1/18/12 BDN
Trista Reynolds, mother of missing toddler Ayla Reynolds, said in an Internet post late Wednesday that she was unable to complete a polygraph test Wednesday because of a medical condition.

Reynolds posted the following statement on the website aylareynolds.com:

“I have prepared this statement because I said that I would release the results of my lie detector test to the public. I took that test today.

“According to the test administrator, who was very courteous and professional, I was unable to complete the test due to a medical condition. It was suggested to me that after treatment by a doctor I would be able to finish the test, but the investigating authority is content with the general outcome of the incomplete test (as it stands).

“This is far from the result I wanted to share with the public, but I will take the advice of the administrator and seek attention for my medical condition so I can be healthy enough to be re-tested if required. In the meantime I wish that people will keep Ayla in their hearts and wish with all of us for her safe return.”

1/28/12 CM
Two maternal relatives of missing toddler Ayla Reynolds have taken polygraph exams, according to a website dedicated to finding the child.

Ayla’s uncle passed the exam, while Ayla’s grandmother was unable to complete it, according to aylareynolds.com.

In an interview with the Morning Sentinel, Becca Hanson, Ayla’s grandmother, declined to discuss the exam’s specific questions, but said she told the polygraph examiner she had nothing to do with 21-month-old toddler’s disappearance.

The exam was administered Friday by Maine State Police at Cumberland County Jail in Portland, she said, but the polygraph administrator couldn’t conclude the exam because Hanson’s daily medications interfered with the results. Hanson takes “muscle relaxers, pain-killers, depression medication and an antibiotic,” she said.

Hanson said she offered to suspend her medication and retake the exam later, but police didn’t offer a direct response, she said.

“They didn’t say yes, they didn’t say no. They just said they didn’t think it was necessary,” she said.

Ronnie Reynolds, Ayla’s uncle, took his exam Thursday at the Maine State Police barracks in Gray, and passed it, according to Jeff Hanson — Becca Hanson’s husband and webmaster for aylareynolds.com.

Ronnie Reynolds was unavailable for comment Friday.

Maine Department of Public Safety Spokesman Steve McCausland said he had no information on any new polygraph exams.

Hanson said the decision to have the family members take the exam was a mutual one between themselves and police.

“They asked and we offered,” she said.

Ayla’s mother, Trista Reynolds, took a polygraph exam Jan. 18, according to the Associated Press. Reynolds was told by the test administrator that she couldn’t complete the exam because of an undisclosed medical condition.

Reynolds said she would be willing to complete the test after treatment by a doctor, but added that investigators were content with the results of the incomplete test, according to the Associated Press.

Ayla’s father, Justin DiPietro, previously took a polygraph test. McCausland said police have told DiPietro what his polygraph results were, but DiPietro declined to divulge those results to the Morning Sentinel.

1/31/12 WCVB
“We are focused on what happened to her in that house. There are three people in the house that have not been truthful. Their story does not pass the smell test,” he said.

Law enforcement sources told McPhee that those people are Justin DiPietro, his girlfriend, Courtney Roberts, 24, and his sister, Alisha DiPietro, 19.

McCausland confirmed that the people in the house on the night Ayla was last seen took lie-detector tests, “and they know the results.”

2/14/12 CM
Bourget said both of his clients are fully cooperative with the investigation. He said he doesn’t know if his clients have taken polygraph exams.

He also said no drugs were consumed or sold at the home.

“There’s a lot of misinformation out there,” he said. “My clients wish they knew the answer (to Ayla’s disappearance), but they don’t. They don’t know.”

The mother and daughter are the only DiPietro family members Bourget is representing, because “they are the only ones who asked me to represent them,” he said.

5/6/12 CM
The paternal aunt of missing toddler Ayla Reynolds said she has taken a polygraph test, but police won’t confirm her claim.

Elisha DiPietro, 23, is one of three adults who were in the 29 Violette Avenue home on Dec. 17, the morning Ayla was reported missing. She addressed the polygraph exam Saturday during the Eyes Open Walk for Baby Ayla, an event to raise awareness about the toddler’s disappearance. DiPietro also shared her family’s contention that a two-week forensic investigation of Ayla’s home may have overlooked some details.

“They did administer a polygraph,” DiPietro said. “I took it. I did fine.”

When DiPietro was asked to clarify whether she passed or failed the exam, DiPietro repeated her initial statement, adding that she’s not concerned how her response will be received by the public.

“I mean, I did fine. It’s what it is. People are going to take things how they take them, and they’re going to call us liars, if they want to call us liars, but I know the truth, and we know the truth, and we know we didn’t do anything wrong. We want Ayla home. We love Ayla.”

DiPietro said she stands by her belief that Ayla was abducted.

“Someone took her,” she said. “That’s why (police) haven’t found her yet.”

1/20/12 Today
The test asked’ “just if I had taken Ayla or if I know who could have gone and taken Ayla,’ Reynolds told TODAY exclusively. “Obviously, no, I have no idea who took her or where she is or anything like (that), and I never took her. I have no reason to hide of any of that. I would never do that.’’

Both parents have cooperated with the investigation, say local police. NBC News asked DiPietro if he would be willing to take another lie-detector test. “How I’m dealing with this deserves no explanation,’’ he said before declining further comment.

***edited to add more statements

Several things stood out to me but the one thing that was most obvious is that not one person made the statement, “I passed the polygraph”. It was said that Ronnie Reynolds passed but there was no statement from him. McCausland said that all three at the house took a polygraph so we can assume Courtney took one but like everything else, she has been silent about it.

Another thing that stood out is those who didn’t report taking a polygraph- Phoebe, Ron, Jessica, Lance and Derek. Did they take one and not report it? Did they take one and fail? Did LE determine it was impossible they could be involved or have any knowledge of what happened? Did any of them refuse a request to take a polygraph?

I also found it a bit unbelievable that Phoebe’s and Elisha’s lawyer and Justin didn’t know if Phoebe and Elisha had taken a polygraph but I suppose it’s possible. Then we have both Justin and Trista claiming they offered to take a polygraph test on “day one” but Justin was given his weeks earlier than Trista was. Why the decision to test the maternal family weeks later? What prompted that?

I think Elisha and Justin sounded defensive and somewhat defiant in their claims and Trista seemed confident, almost taunting before taking hers. The statement made by Trista after her test sounded like she had help in preparing it so it’s hard to get a feeling of her attitude at that time.

I don’t know what medical condition Trista had that made it impossible for her to complete her test or if she ever took another one and I don’t know if Becca went back for another test.

We have Trista’s word that they were content with the extent of her test and Becca said they didn’t think it was necessary for her to test again, Justin said he smoked it and Elisha said she did fine. McCausland didn’t say if any of them passed or failed, he only stated the three in the house the night Ayla went missing, took them and they know the results, and that Justin knows how he did because they told him.

If this had been the first case I had followed, and at the time that everyone took their polygraphs, all we really knew was that Ayla disappeared from her bed and there was a custody dispute between Trista and Justin, I would probably be suspicious of both sides of the family. I would wonder if any of the family members really passed their polygraph.

This isn’t the first case I’ve followed though and we knew a lot more information by the time they were all tested. We saw Justin’s and Courtney’s cars towed away and we saw the paternal family kept out of their home for weeks, while the investigators were in and out every day collecting evidence. We saw the homicide investigators going in the home and the crime scene tape going up.

On top of those things we have what LE had said. The majority of my opinion is based on what LE has said but what they haven’t said influences me as well. If LE wasn’t satisfied with Trista’s and Becca’s tests and they didn’t return to take them again, why hasn’t McCausland said they aren’t cooperating?

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36 Comments

Posted by on January 31, 2015 in Uncategorized

 

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36 responses to “The Polygraphs

  1. mountain mama

    January 31, 2015 at 12:25 am

    Please light a candle for Ayla ❤

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=ayla

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=ARAA

    http://www.gratefulness.org/candles/candles.cfm?l=eng&gi=WIA

    Also everyone please remember our friends at Ayla’s facebook pages and blogs. Many people are working to keep Ayla on everyone’s minds. Thank you all for the time you devote to Ayla. Keep reading, commenting, sharing and liking. Ayla’s voices won’t be silenced. The truth will come out and Ayla and those who love her will finally have answers and justice.

    https://www.facebook.com/AylaReynoldsLaurieBingham

    https://www.facebook.com/BringBabyAylaAndBabyLisaHome

    https://www.facebook.com/TruthforAyla

    http://wheresayla.blogspot.com/

     
  2. Nina

    January 31, 2015 at 5:06 am

    Thank you, MM, for putting this all together in one place and accepting my suggestion. It’s given me more to think about. I agree with you 100% when you stated: “Several things stood out to me but the one thing that was most obvious is that not one person made the statement, ‘I passed the polygraph’.”

     
    • Glenda Armandi

      January 31, 2015 at 11:31 am

      MM That was quite an informative article. Thank You. It appears tat everyone involved with the Dipetrio side used avoidance tactics form day one, including their lawyer!! It is so aggravating!

       
      • Anonymous

        January 31, 2015 at 4:29 pm

        What kind of a lawyer doesn’t know if his cliets have taken a polygraph? Duh.

         
  3. Karen

    January 31, 2015 at 7:55 am

    1/31/12 WCVB
    “We are focused on what happened to her in that house. There are three people in the house that have not been truthful. Their story does not pass the smell test,” he said.

    Law enforcement sources told McPhee that those people are Justin DiPietro, his girlfriend, Courtney Roberts, 24, and his sister, Alisha DiPietro, 19.

    McCausland confirmed that the people in the house on the night Ayla was last seen took lie-detector tests, “and they know the results.”

    When I read this, the three have not been truthful, that tells me how all three did on the tests.
    And what happened to Ayla in the house?

     
  4. Dee

    January 31, 2015 at 8:47 am

    Thanks for this mama. It’s good seeing it all together in one post.
    It has bothered me that neither Trista or Becca were able to complete their polys. Even though I don’t suspect them, I wanted to see them taken. But what you said rings true…
    “The majority of my opinion is based on what LE has said but what they haven’t said influences me as well. If LE wasn’t satisfied with Trista’s and Becca’s tests and they didn’t return to take them again, why hasn’t McCausland said they aren’t cooperating?”

     
  5. anna

    January 31, 2015 at 9:29 am

    It disturbs me that more people did not get tested. Also, Trista and her sister’s tests bother me a bit. Alcohol and drugs can cause problems with the tests as well as a lot of prescription medications. If Justin and Courtney were doing drugs or drinking it would mess up their results as well.

    It is obvious to me that Justin and Elisha failed by their responses to questions about it. Lie detector tests are used to eliminate the family so detectives can move on. If Justin want the detectives to move on and investigate a kidnapping, he needs to retest.

    In Kyron Horman’s case, the step-mom failed the polygraph three times! It helped detectives get on her tail, but she went silent, so Kyron has not been able to be found. The Dips went silent too, and are just sitting praying Ayla is not found.

     
  6. CG

    January 31, 2015 at 10:02 am

    I have a lot of qualms because polygraphs are based on junk science. Their primary usefulness is that they scare people into confessing when they are told the poly detected lies. The poly can’t detect lies or truth only physiological changes that are consistent with lying, nervousness, etc. There is an excellent reason polys are not admissible in court. That reason is they are not reliable evidence of truth-telling or lying.

    If the polys were the only evidence we knew of and if they indicated someone outright failed, I would not be willing to draw a conclusion that person committed any crime. What I find convincing in this case is the big picture.

     
    • Lee

      January 31, 2015 at 10:25 am

      Because of the physiological changes, polygraphs are useful in indicating the possibility of lying. Yes, they are not fool proof. It’s well known that accomplished liars secure in their abilities to exceed in promoting their lies can fool a LDT, and test as truthful while lying. On the flip side there are cases like the illegal immigrants whose daughter was killed by the neighbor for “climbing his pool steps” who test untruthful when telling the truth, due to their nervousness from other factors.

      LE expects some false readings, and as such structure the testing to minimize the chances as much as possible.

      The possibility of inaccuracy does not negate the usefulness of the polygraph as an investigative tool. That is it’s intent, not as proof positive of guilt.

      The real interesting aspect for me is, as others have pointed out, the tested individuals reactions and responses to the testing.

       
    • Grace Wilson

      January 31, 2015 at 3:16 pm

      I read that poly’s were based on junk science too, even at this site: https://antipolygraph.org/index.shtml, then I saw this article: https://antipolygraph.org/articles/article-034.shtml telling how to beat a lie detector test. You can’t have it both ways, either the test is one mans opinion and the scribbles mean nothing, or they mean something and to beat it you must manipulate them.

      It’s not rocket science but the logic is sound. Lying causes stress. Stress causes physical reactions. Physical reactions can be recorded. Whether they can be interpreted is the real question, and if they can’t, and it’s all the polygrapher, you just need to beat him, not the machine.

       
      • CG

        January 31, 2015 at 7:30 pm

        I think you described it very well. It depends on the polygraphist, it’s not verifiable (doesn’t meet scientific standards), and any conclusion that a person lied could also be explained by other factors which may not be known to the polygraphist (and thus couldn’t be taken into account in his or her conclusion).

        “False confessions are a leading cause of wrongful convictions. According to the Innocence Project, about 25 percent of the documented DNA exoneration cases involved incriminating statements, full confessions or guilty pleas by innocent suspects.

        The polygraph is an important tool in the extraction of false confessions. Despite the well-documented inaccuracy of the polygraph, police in North America (less so in Europe and other areas) still rely heavily on the “lie detector” and its even less accurate cousin, the voice stress analyzer, in the investigative process. If an innocent suspect fails the polygraph exam, police will use the results to persuade him or her that they must be guilty. In some cases, police will tell the suspect that they failed the exam even when they didn’t in an attempt to obtain a confession.”
        http://wrongfulconvictionsblog.org/2012/02/23/the-polygraph-and-false-confessions/

        “Confessions, when true, are an important tool in convicting criminals. But false confessions frequently play a major role in convicting innocent people. Experiments show that juries and potential witnesses are influenced by confessions even if they know they were coerced. Also in the lab, experienced polygraph examiners, fingerprint experts, and other experts, when informed of a confession, see what they expect to see — that is, evidence of guilt.”
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/11/111116151333.htm

        and here is an interesting first hand account of someone who took a troubling poly and her perspective on why someone might falsely confess.
        http://pursuitmag.com/dangers-false-confessions-and-accusations/

         
        • mountain mama

          January 31, 2015 at 8:17 pm

          Well If LE was using the polygraph to try to get a false confession in Ayla’s course, it doesn’t appear to have worked out for them.

           
        • CG

          January 31, 2015 at 8:31 pm

          MM I doubt they were trying to get a false confession, but I bet they were looking for a genuine one as well as getting more information out of those whom they described as not truthful.

           
      • anna

        February 1, 2015 at 12:38 am

        Grace,

        I’m sorry to disagree, but if a person is telling the truth there is no problem. If they are nervous about a certain question, they tell the polygrapher in advance, and the question is taken out or redone to the persons requests. I have taken two before, and the before uptake is courteous and thorough and questions with full answers are written down before hand and redone until they are sure there is no give. There are only 2-3 questions about anything relating to a crime, and about 15-20 about a persons name, age, weight, sex, etc… so they can scope the truth reactions in the body.

         
      • anna

        February 1, 2015 at 12:40 am

        Don’t get me wrong, I think Trista’s was failed also because of her drug and alcohol abuse. I think Justin is a druggie also which causes a failed test.

         
  7. Lee

    January 31, 2015 at 10:37 am

    Great post MM. Thank you again for your efforts.

     
    • mountain mama

      January 31, 2015 at 10:55 am

      I just added a statement from both Trista and Justin from the Today show to the post. Here they are:

      The test asked’ “just if I had taken Ayla or if I know who could have gone and taken Ayla,’ Reynolds told TODAY exclusively. “Obviously, no, I have no idea who took her or where she is or anything like (that), and I never took her. I have no reason to hide of any of that. I would never do that.’’

      Both parents have cooperated with the investigation, say local police. NBC News asked DiPietro if he would be willing to take another lie-detector test. “How I’m dealing with this deserves no explanation,’’ he said before declining further comment.

      http://www.today.com/id/46070009/ns/today-today_people/#.VMz4i2jF9P_

       
      • anna

        January 31, 2015 at 2:07 pm

        Justin may think his actions don’t deserve an explanation, but they deserve punishment. His actions hurting and hiding his child deserve to be brought to justice. When a child is hurt, an explanation is also deserved. What kind of person says “I don’t have to explain why my child disappeared from my house, under my care and her blood was found in my room”???????

        I wonder what the statute of limitations in Maine is for helping hinder and hide things in an investigation? If it is only the three years, they need to hold another grand jury and compel Elisha, Courtney and Phoebe to talk. They may have plead the fifth before so they didn’t get charged.

         
        • mountain mama

          January 31, 2015 at 2:25 pm

          “What kind of person says “I don’t have to explain why my child disappeared from my house, under my care and her blood was found in my room”???????”

          BOOM!

           
  8. Anonymous

    January 31, 2015 at 4:34 pm

    What kind of person says “I don’t have to explain why my child disappeared from my house, under my care and her blood was found in my room”???????”

    One who has been entitled all of his life to be just what he is and do just what helikes. No pretense to be anything other than that. (I forget how Heidi described him, but he is what he is.) Take him as he is or lump it..

    One who is deemed exceptional and not like “ordinary” people by himself and by those around him..

     
  9. katieh33

    January 31, 2015 at 5:57 pm

    Thank you for touching on the polygraphs… I know this topic is complicated as I have tried to work on it as well and have always come up short with a final post.

    Also… with the closing of J4A, I have reopened another site similarly named. For those of you who enjoyed posting at J4A, or those who are looking for yet another forum for discussing Ayla related events, you are welcome at http://justice4aylareynolds.blogspot.com/

     
    • Lee

      January 31, 2015 at 6:38 pm

      Hi Katie.

      Congratulations on opening your new blog, and thank you for your dedication to keeping Ayla’s name out there.

       
      • Anonymous

        January 31, 2015 at 9:28 pm

        And thanks for your dedication in continuing to follow Trista as the number one suspect. Unlike Courtney, and Justin, Trista needs to answer a whole lot of questions!

         
        • 321

          February 1, 2015 at 9:32 am

          Love your sarcasm. 🙂

           
        • Nina

          February 1, 2015 at 9:46 am

          MM, Lee, Dee, it would be helpful in keeping FFA welcoming to all if you could edit out (or as Penny would call it, “censor”) snarky attacks. It’s not my blog but am putting it forth as an unsolicited suggestion.

           
        • mountain mama

          February 1, 2015 at 11:53 am

          I will address it shortly Nina.

           
  10. Karen

    January 31, 2015 at 7:50 pm

    I think it is more than the polygraph tests that makes LE believe the 3 know all the answers.

    Why did LE not ask Trista and Becca to repeat the test? I think it is because of the evidence in the house. But whatever the reason, I think LE has a reason.

     
    • msperidot19

      January 31, 2015 at 10:35 pm

      Definitely, the evidence tells some of what happened to Ayla. As well as what LE were told not adding up.

       
      • Anonymous

        January 31, 2015 at 11:52 pm

        I think the three had stories that didn’t mesh, or LE could prove off the bat that they were lying.

         
        • msperidot19

          February 1, 2015 at 12:34 am

          Anon @ 11:52, I think that too.

           
  11. msperidot19

    January 31, 2015 at 10:33 pm

    Thank you mama, this is interesting for sure. And I was wishing to know who took the exams. Looks like we only know about a few.

    I do think polygraphs are a useful tool. My understanding is the precision of the questions and the skill of the examiner is very important. Polygraph exams value are somewhat comparable to how different LE Detectives skills at doing interviews are not all equal. Some are better than others. Of course interviews can actually get information and polygraphs suggest issues with certain questions .

    I understand they don’t literally prove anything but suggest possibilities.

    It is horrible they are being mis-used. I have to go read the links provide.

    Also I wish LE would who give Polygraph exams, do so equally across the board when they investigate a crime. I have thought ‘they’ don’t want to spend the money on people they don’t really suspect. Also I think they worry about Defense lawyers possibly using and abusing how everyone tests. Yes I believe sometimes there are ways to get them introduced in court cases. Or to publicly use to suggest things.

     
  12. msperidot19

    January 31, 2015 at 11:10 pm

    I have no expertise however have an opinion fweiiw on something that could have interfered with Trista taking the exam. I have no personal knowledge of Trista. During interviews about what happened to Ayla she often would take a deep breath. She looked exactly like people who are experiencing shortness of air from stress or asthma or many other possible medical conditions.

    You cannot demand to take a LE polygraph or a retake. You can only request.

    I think LE lack of interest in Trista and Becca retaking the exams is they did get what they needed. I think the fact the exams were even given was a legal issue and iirc Trista was asking for one? Anyone else remember that?

    Possibly a trend developed among all takers.

    It looks to me, legal agencies involved in looking at Ayla’s being gone believe that she was fatally harmed at Violet Ave.

    The last three adults who say they were with her are where the answers need to come from.

     
  13. msperidot19

    February 1, 2015 at 12:56 am

    http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/mythbusters/mythbusters-database/beat-lie-detection-test/
    did anyone look at this? I thought it interesting.

    I have never taken a test myself. A family member did years ago for a job. He failed if he ever stole – I think it was. They didn’t hire him based on the exam.

    I don’t believe in taking polygraph for jobs. Part of a police state in my mind.

     
  14. anna

    February 1, 2015 at 1:57 am

    I have taken two, part of CPA hiring. They ask about 20 questions about name, age, family etc. that are chosen by you in the interview before, then 2-3 questions pertaining to what they want to know dispersed within the test (on mine it was dealing with stealing and noticing cooked books). The questions are gone over before, and the reason for so few of the real questions mixed with misc. is to see the reaction. I passed both I took and they were very professional. I hope LE in Maine administered professional tests, but I haven’t heard Trista, Justin or Elisha complain about the test. I do know they asked me about drug and alcohol abuse beforehand and told me it can skew the test.

     
  15. Anonymous

    February 1, 2015 at 5:02 pm

    Years ago at the college where I worked, expensive equipmen and money was stolen from one of the labs. Every worker on campus was told that we would all have to take polygraph exams. Without being interviewed as to whether we had alibis or not. Or whether any of us had keys or access to the labs. We were told our employment was at stake if we didn’t agree to be polygraphed. I refused as did many others. Faculty was not asked to take the polygraph exam, only “staff”. The decision to polygraph only staff and workers seemed more than a bit biased. Some workers said they were retaining legal advice.

    Luckily, the thief confessed before things came to a head. He was a new custodian / cleaner lately hired by the college who had keys and nightly access to the labs.

     
    • mountain mama

      February 1, 2015 at 6:02 pm

      I think even when you are totally innocent it would be frightening to take a poly when it’s connected to a criminal investigation.

       

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